Choosing the Right Bike for You

Many different means of evaluating a bike make purchasing a new one difficult. Even for those people who are paid to ride, buying a new bike is hard. The truth is that there are a lot of things to think about when buying a bicycle. Evaluate the safety, comfort, and use of the future bike. You also need to see how the bike looks, and how frequently you’ll ride and the location of those rides. All the existing options make it hard to make a choice; this choice is made more difficult by all the emerging technologies. Opting for the correct bike for you is as easy as using these simple criteria.

The first thing you need to do is try the bicycle on for size, meaning sit on it and make sure that your feet are still flat on the floor so you will be able to stop yourself. There are some people that say this isn't the best way to choose, though. These experts say in order to have the best cycling experience you can, you should allow for a few inches between the ground and your feet. If your feet are on the ground and your knees are bent when you sit on the seat of the bike, it generally means that the seat is sitting too low for you and too close to the crossbar. If this is happening, when you start to pedal the bike then your knees are going to come up too high.

If you want to ride a road bike, you will need to subtract about nine inches from your inseam measurement. This is because of the size of the tires on your road bike. City riding is done with thin tires, designed to work perfectly with the smooth concrete roads and sidewalks you find in a city. You will want to subtract 12" for a mountain bike. The tires on a mountain bike are not the same as a road bike. These tires are designed to handle rocky and jagged terrain so are therefore thicker. You can of course use a mountain bike for road cycling but this isn't supposed to be their primary use.

How many gears will you use on a regular basis? Choose according to how you’ll ride; mountainous areas require more gears than site flat land areas do. Many beginning cyclists think that the more gears a bicycle has, the better it is. In actuality, you may never use all the gears. Save your money for a different feature you’ll really use. Find out where you’ll ride your bike, especially if this is your main vehicle, and make sure you have enough gears to handle the areas through which you will travel. There are a lot of criteria to use when deciding which cycling bicycle is right for you. Are you going to be riding your bicycle every day or riding it only when you feel the urge to? At what height do you feel the most comfortable? Do you prefer your feet to rest flat on the ground or do you like to have some room between them and the ground when you are sitting on the bicycle’s seat? All of these factors will come into play as you make your choice.

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